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Peter Tass (Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Jülich, Germany)

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"Long-lasting therapeutic effects of desynchronizing brain stimulation" / Thursday, February 18, 2010, 17:15 h

What
  • Bernstein Seminar
When Feb 18, 2010
from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where Lecture Hall, Hansastr. 9a
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The Bernstein Center Freiburg



Bernstein Seminar
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Peter Tass
Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine
Neuromodulation (INM 7)
Research Center Jülich, Germany

 
LONG-LASTING THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF DESYNCHRONIZING BRAIN STIMULATION

Thursday, February 18, 2010

17:15 h

Lecture Hall (ground floor)
BCCN building
Hansastraße 9A
79104 Freiburg
Abstract:
A number of brain diseases, e.g. movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, are characterized by abnormal neuronal synchronization. Within the last years permanent high-frequency (HF) deep brain stimulation became the standard therapy for medically refractory movement disorders. To overcome limitations of standard HF deep brain stimulation, we use a model based approach. To this end, we make mathematical models of affected neuronal target populations and use methods from statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics to develop mild and efficient control techniques. Along the lines of a top-down approach we test our control techniques in oscillator networks as well as neural networks. In particular, we specifically utilize dynamical self-organization principles and plasticity rules. In this way, we have developed coordinated reset (CR) stimulation [1], an effectively desynchronizing brain stimulation technique. The goal is not only to counteract pathological synchronization on a fast time scale, but also to unlearn pathological synchrony by therapeutically reshaping neural networks [2]. I shall present the theory, results from animal experiments as well as clinical applications: (i) Electrical CR stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease via depth electrodes. (ii) Acoustic CR stimulation for the treatment of tinnitus.

1. Tass PA. Biol Cybern, 2003; 94: 58-66
2. Tass PA, Majtanik M. Biol Cybern, 2006; 94: 58-66
The talk is open to the public. Guests are cordially invited!
www.bcf.uni-freiburg.de
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